Journeysmatter

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Monthly Archives: April 2019

Majuli Island #Assam – Visit it before it disappears

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Twilight over the Brahmaputra as we leave Majuli Island to Nemati Ghat

Majuli (Land between two rivers) is a river island on the mighty Brahmaputra in Assam. While getting in and out requires a lot of effort, not going there is not an option. With closer observation, it is infact the cultural capital of Assam. The island is now a District and covers a total of 441 square kilometers and has over 144 villages, schools, colleges and all the amenities required to lead a decent life.

To reach Majuli, travel around 300 kms from Guwahati, reach Jorhat from where you land up at Nemati Ghat which is on the banks of the Brahmaputra. There are about 7 ferry services at various times of the day plying between Nemati Ghat and Majuli with the last service around 330 PM from either sides. We spent 5 hours which was more like an orientation session to Majuli. That was however good to get us back in the future. Savor some of the main sights of this picturesque island

Auniati Satra

Entrance of the Auniati Satra
The entrance of the Auniati Satra. Satras are the Assamese Vaishnavite monasteries for religious practices. These great Vaishnava monasteries were founded at the initiative of the Ahom Kings of Assam in the middle of the 17th century.
Jaya and Vijaya Guarding the entrance to the shrine of Krishna at the Auniati Satra
Jaya and Vijaya Guarding the entrance to the shrine of Krishna at the Auniati Satra. They are places where the Vaishnavs dedicate themselves to serve God and also preach the followers for devotion towards God. They are also the centre of art and culture in Assam.
The Ceremonial drum at the Auniati Satra
The Ceremonial drum at the Auniati Satra. The Ceremonial drum at the Auniati Satra. They make use of various ritual and devotional performances to help people understand and practice the doctrine of the Vaishnavism and realize belief in one God and the means of the ultimate eternal peace. Raas Leela is a powerful and a beautiful way of conveying the essence of vaishnavism

Samaguri Satra

Entrance board to Samaguri Satra
The Samaguri Satra – Mask making is a special craft not just of Majuli, but also of the entire state of Assam. Srimanta Sankardeva first used them in the enactment of his Bhaonas. He created this craft to capture expressions which otherwise was not possible to enact in a regular face. The Samaguri Satra preserves this tradition (Notes Credit – https://www.discovernortheast.in/hemchandra-goswami/)
Guru Hemchandra Goswami at work on a wooden scultpture
Shri Hemchandra Goswami, the Guru at Samaguri Satra trains 10 – 12 boys in the craft every year (Notes Credit – https://www.discovernortheast.in/hemchandra-goswami/)
Master Hemchandra Goswami at work in his Samaguri Satra
Artist of the Samaguri Satra
Ahom king Chakradhwaj Singha built this Satra in 1663 A.D, and since then it has showed immense deftness in this craft and for generations trained young artisans to pass on the heritage and give it a momentum vis-à-vis the present. Two other Satras— Bor Elangi Satra (which moved from Salmora Mouza in Majuli to Titabar in Jorhat district) and Khatpaar Satra in Sivasagar, are notable practitioners of this craft and they have kept the tradition moving. (Notes credit – https://www.discovernortheast.in/hemchandra-goswami/)
Masks at Samaguri Satra
The earlier masks were restricted to portraying just a single expression where the eyes and the lips were not shown. Now the masks are built in a manner so as to facilitate the movement of the eyes and the lips. Again in some other characters artifices are employed, making the removal of the head or the nose during the play seem real. This adds a dramatic character to the story, enhancing it in the process and also lending an aesthetic appeal to it. The atmosphere thus becomes more animated and energetic. Materials used for the masks include bamboo, cane, cow dung, jute, potter’s clay, and muslin cloth (https://www.discovernortheast.in/hemchandra-goswami/)

Uttar Kamalabari Satra

The Uttar Kamalabari Satra is an influential religious and cultural monastery of Majuli established in the year 1673.
The Uttar Kamalabari Satra is an influential religious and cultural monastery of Majuli established in the year 1673.
A residence of one of the students of the Satra. This Satra is famous for performing art like Gayan bayan, Sutra Naas, Ankia Bhaona (dramas of Sankardev and Madhabdev).
A residence of one of the students of the Satra. This Satra is famous for performing art like Gayan bayan, Sutra Naas, Ankia Bhaona (dramas of Sankardev and Madhabdev).
The residential quarters of the Uttar Kamalabari Satra. In this Satra both the Satradhikar and the Bhakats (disciples) spend their life in celibacy. The Bhagavad Gita is the central deity to whom prayers are held everyday.
The residential quarters of the Uttar Kamalabari Satra. In this Satra both the Satradhikar and the Bhakats (disciples) spend their life in celibacy. The Bhagavad Gita is the central deity to whom prayers are held everyday.

Handicrafts from the Mising Tribe

  • Rengam Cooperative
  • Weaving centre
  • The Cooperative has been helping the Mising tribe further its skill.

The Majuli Brand Mustard Oil Project

Majuli Brand Mustard Oil Project is a contineous project being run- by IMPACT-NE since 2005. It is a kind of project for socio-economic development of Majuli through agricultural processing and rural industrialization. The main objective of the project is to ensure benefit to the farming community by providing them direct market linkage to sale their mustard seeds at actual market rate. As mustard is the major agricultural products of Majuli so it requires a competitive market for the benefit of the farmers.

  • The Majuli Mustard Project. An avenue to provide employment locally.
  • Mustard placed out for Drying. Mustard is the largest agricultural product of Majuli in terms of output
  • Oil tins for Mustard ready to be pumped in to Oil extraction machine. A log has been used to serve as a makeshift handle
  • The Mustard is poured in from the top and the extracted oil filters down while the cake is thrown out. The residue is added back in to the machine to ensure that the oil is fully extracted before being discarded as fodder.
  • Lord Vishwakarma is the resident deity of the Mustard Oil Mill
The Majuli Island Mustard Oil Project

A Simple Lunch before Departure

The Ferry Service

Heading to Majuli Island

All major airlines fly in to Guwahati from where one can either take a train or drive about 315 kms (7 hours) to reach Nemati Ghat from where one can board a Ferry to Majuli. Majuli does not have any chain hotels but provides a number of home stays. For more questions write – response@narmadaholidays.com.

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