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#Amritsar Memories : Attari – #Wagah border and FarmStay #vacations

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The Indian Tri color

Part 1 of my blog on a rejuvenated Amritsar focused on the newest attraction in town, The Partition Museum, dedicated to the pain and suffering endured by millions during one of the largest and most brutal mass migration in history. The museum has since officially opened for viewing and more sections are being opened in a phased manner.

Part 2 focused on the serene Darbar Sahib (The Golden Temple), Akhal Takht, Sarovar and its surroundings. I spent a whole afternoon exploring the nooks and corners of the Darbar sahib complex, learning about the contributions made by the Sikh Gurus, ordinary folk, Armed forces, Agricultural community and the role of Punjab in shaping the history of this great country.

In the 3rd part, i share my experiences and feelings about the newly minted precincts of The Heritage street, another tragic memorial from the freedom struggle – The Jallianwala Bagh and finally the humble Guru ka Langar.

In the Fourth part, I wrote about various dishes on offer and also introduced readers to other Vloggers who have been covering the Amrtisar food scene with so much of passion

The final part of the Amritsar experience is rounded off by a visit to the Attari (Indian Side village) – Wagah (Pakistan side village) border and a visit to a Farm Stay, a concept that seems to be catching up and should a huge boost to the tourism sector and thereby incomes in the state.

My visit to the India – Pakistan border which falls between #Attari village on the Indian side and #Wagah border on the Pakistan side was planned a saturday. All previous traveller accounts including those of my wife and in-laws spoke of an exciting spectacle comprising of dances, singing and finally the Beating of the retreat finally culminating in the lowering of flags and slam closing of the gates. I was eagerly looking forward to this experience. The ceremony has almost gone on uninterrupted since 1959 except during periods of confrontation on other parts of the border. While the Border Security Force leads from the Indian side, the Pakistan side is led by the Pakistan Rangers.

The drive from the centre of #Amritsar takes about 45 minutes to an hour. With the ceremony expected to start by 5 PM, we assumed that reaching with an hour to spare would help me get an entry and a seat at the stadium.  We were wrong! From the parking area to the entry point it is a mile and to my surprise i found that the crowds that were pouring in far outnumbered the capacity of the stadium. Since entry was on a first come first served basis, the crowds i was given to understand were pouring in from noon and had occupied the stadium unmindful of the scorching pre-summer sun.

Busloads of tourists were alighting, civilian defence personnel were getting in to the stadium with valid ID papers, mounted #BSF horsemen were keeping a strict vigil and were respectfully requesting tourists to maintain order and of course ice cream vendors were busy attending to tired visitors. When it was finally clear that it was impossible to make it in, the left out visitors had to contend with watching the ceremony on a huge but very unclear LCD screen.

Attari border crowds waiting to enter the stadium to watch the beating of the retreat

Tourists and visitors who were unable to get in to the stadium to watch the beating of the retreat mill around the premises and try to get as close as possible to the gate and the LCD screen

Lesson learnt – On weekdays during the tourist season (Oct – March), it is advisable to head to the border atleast 3 – 4 hours ahead of the start. On weekends, one should head there atleast 5 – 6 hours in advance. Am assuming that such a punishing wait is not required during off season and summer months. Carry water, a hat along with optional sun screen. Entrance to the border ceremony is free and if anyone pretends to sell tickets you will know that you are with a tout.

The excitement however is palpable and hearbeats rise as the BSF guards start marching in to the narrow strip leading to the border. On the other side of the border one can see the 400 feet high pole on which the Pakistan flag is flown and a large portrait of Quaid e Azam Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founding father of Pakistan. Once the ceremonies begin, all the music, foot stamping are drowned out by the raucous crowds on either sides of the border. The LCD screen is blur and does not give a nice viewing experience. I tried to jostle my way up to the barricades amongst young, elderly, children perched on parents’ shoulders but gave up after while. I eagerly look forward to the day when the whole experience could be webcasted on 4K video.

Attari Wagah border images

THe Indian flag flies high. Unlucky visitors milling around the gate waiting for the ceremony to begin. A glimpse of the narrow strip leading to the border. The Pakistan gate is visible along with the portrait of MA Jinnah

On the last day before taking my return flight back to base, i had an opportunity to do a familiarization trip to a farm stay. The farm, owned by a tour operator is located in his native village a 30 minute drive from Amritsar. Within 15 minutes of leaving the city precincts, one is welcomed by lush green wheat fields, swathes of mustard fields identified by the golden yellow flowers, farmers transporting produce on their tractor trailers and local gurudwaras where people congregate. The Farm Stay consisted of a ground level where the guest rooms were located, about 4 of them to be precise, a well laid out dining area offering breakfast and optional lunch and dinner. The owner resided upstairs and the care takers were housed in the staff quarters. Fresh vegetables and milk are from the farm and meat is brought from outside for preparation.

Farm fresh vegetables and villa entrance

Farm stay. Fields with Pea, Radish, Cabbage, Beetroots and just harvested and dried potatoes and peas

It was calming to see the cows lazing around their fodder house.

Cows on the property and the fodder preparation and feeding area

Cows on the property and the fodder preparation and feeding area

Agriculture is Punjab’s mainstay with Wheat and Mustard fields dotting the landscape in and around the farm stay. With the likes of AirBnB allowing holidayers to plan in a jiffy without having to go through the rigmarole of hotels, the concept of Farm stays, if backed up with a clear government policy, could provide tourists with a wonderful option.

Wheat, Mustard fields and a tractor

Wheat, Mustard fields and a tractor

Other attractions in Amritsar include the Gobindagarh Fort built in 1760. It was earlier occupied by the Army but is now home to a museum showcasing Punjab and its glorious history. Be notified of any private events in the fort which may prevent visitors from entering. On the lines of Chokhi Dani in Jaipur, Amritsar now boasts of Sadda Pind, a village themed resort. One could plan a visit to these places based on the interest levels of the touring party. Amritsar is a fabulous Winter destination. An extension to Amritsar is a trip to Chandigarh (5 hours) and further to Dalhousie and Dharamshala. Amritsar on its own is perfect for 3 nights / 4 days.

Getting to Amritsar – Airlines Indigo, vistara and Spicejet fly direct from Mumbai. They also fly direct from New Delhi along with Air India and Jet Airways.

Trains – There are a total of 27 trains between New Delhi and Amritsar. The Journey takes a little over 6.5 hours and one has a choice between day and night time trains. Advance reservation can be done on the Indian railways booking portal.

Go ahead, pack your wollens and head to this fabulous urban destination.

 

 

Discovering Food Trails of #Amritsar

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Part 1 of my blog on a rejuvenated Amritsar focused on the newest attraction in town, The Partition Museum, dedicated to the pain and suffering endured by millions during one of the largest and most brutal mass migration in history. The museum has since officially opened for viewing and more sections are being opened in a phased manner.

Part 2 focused on the serene Darbar Sahib (The Golden Temple), Akhal Takht, Sarovar and its surroundings. I spent a whole afternoon exploring the nooks and corners of the Darbar sahib complex, learning about the contributions made by the Sikh Gurus, ordinary folk, Armed forces, Agricultural community and the role of Punjab in shaping the history of this great country.

In the 3rd part, i share my experiences and feelings about the newly minted precincts of The Heritage street, another tragic memorial from the freedom struggle – The Jallianwala Bagh and finally the humble Guru ka Langar.

A trip to Amrtisar is not complete without savouring what is on offer. There is plenty to gorge on in and around Heritage Street but the nooks and alleys offer plenty more. The internet is full of info on eating joints in Amritsar; Kesar da dhaba, Chungi’s kulche , Amritsar fish and tandoori chicken joints and many more are well researched and covered by ardent foodies.

One such Foodie and an ardent fellow travel blogger is Mr Harish Bali of visa2explore. His VLogs on Food Trails across Delhi, Agra and now Amritsar will make you want to follow him on his trails. Apart from detailed videos on the joints, he has provided details of all the joints as notes to his VLog. Here is a link to Mr Bali’s delicious journey in Amritsar.

Kanha sweets, another well documented and frequented eatery is one such place that is worth visiting for breakfast. Seems to be located more for the convenience of college going folks on Dayanand nagar; The DAV college is a stone’s throw away. Great pooris, chhole, Alu launji are enough to settle in to your stomach and provide you with the required energy OR sleep. The pickle seems to be a speciality and one can watch fellow visitors chomp away. A plate of two ghee fried pooris costs 80 bucks. Many of them follow up on the pooris with a plate of Sweet Halwa. Two pooris did me in and i felt my trip almost coming to an end. After this, other joints in Amritsar felt like a distant dream.

Unlimited Chhole, Alu Launji, Onions and a sweet n Sour pickle

The Poori Breakfast at Kanha Sweets – Unlimited Chhole, Alu Launji, Onions and a sweet n Sour pickle

They also have a sweet stall right up front selling dry sweets, Bengali sweets and fresh rice firni.

Dry Sweets, Bengali sweets, Rice Firni and a Glass of Lassi with loads of cream to top up

Kanha Sweets – At the store front, Dry Sweets, Bengali sweets, Rice Firni and a Glass of Lassi with loads of cream to top up

Staying on DAV college road, once the street lights come on, a roadside joint comes to life. Made from mango pulp, sugar and sundried, this is a joint that virtually stretches the mango to an all year delicacy. The most interesting part is the variety that is on offer – a sweet variety, a sour variety and when served with a variety of spice powders (chilli, coriander, fennel, black salt) and a dash of lime, it elevates the taste and introduces you to a completely new set of possibilities. Watch people buy by the kilo for their homes and gatherings. A must visit; Dont mind the mosquitoes though.

The Roadside Aam Papar Shop outside DAV college, a take away sour Aam papar with spice powders and a Dash of Lime

The Roadside Aam Papar Shop outside DAV college, a take away sour Aam papar with spice powders and a Dash of Lime

A meal was something that i could not have handled. On such occassions, one can settle for a chaat – many light snacks without feeling light on oneself and the pocket. Brijwasi chats near Crystal chowk on Cooper road is a popular joint. A great place to hangout with friends and share multiple plates of Chaat. Begun in 1958, the second generation seems to be doing a fine job of handling the quality of offering.

Aloo tikkis, bun tikkis and Dahi Bhallas are popular chaats in the North of India

Aloo tikkis, bun tikkis and Dahi Bhallas are popular chaats in the North of India

Spaced out, one can taste them all and enjoy the fares on offer.

Coming up – A failed visit to the Attari – Wagah border and an opportunity for Farm Stays.

 

A Rejuvenated #Amritsar – Part 3 Heritage street, Guru ka Langar and Jallianwala Bagh

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Guru ka Langar Community washing of utensils

Part 1 of my blog on a rejuvenated Amritsar focused on the newest attraction in town, The Partition Museum, dedicated to the pain and suffering endured by millions during one of the largest and most brutal mass migration in history. The museum has since officially opened for viewing and more sections are being opened in a phased manner.

Part 2 focused on the serene Darbar Sahib (The Golden Temple), Akhal Takht, Sarovar and its surroundings. I spent a whole afternoon exploring the nooks and corners of the Darbar sahib complex, learning about the contributions made by the Sikh Gurus, ordinary folk, Armed forces, Agricultural community and the role of Punjab in shaping the history of this great country.

In the 3rd part, i share my observations and feelings about the newly minted precincts of The Heritage street, another tragic memorial from the freedom struggle – The Jallianwala Bagh and finally the humble Guru ka Langar.

A walk through the Heritage street starts right from the town hall, crossing the installations of parliament, Dr BR Ambedkar, The statue of Ranjit singh ji, crossing the Jallianwala Bagh right up to the gates of the Harmandir sahib.

Town Hall Red sandstone building, replica of parliament building of India, bust of Dr Ambedkar and Maharaja Ranjit Singh ji statue

A walk on the Heritage street begins from the Town Hall, crossing the replica installation of the Parliament of India, bust of Dr. B.R Ambedkar and the grand intersection with the mounted statue of Maharaja Ranjit Singh ji

The Heritage street is teeming with visitors at all hours. The place gets a magical feel once the lights come on in the evening.

Heritage street, Amritsar

Portion of Heritage street from Darbar Sahib right up to Jallianwala Bagh. Teeming with life.

Multinational eateries, Indian coffee shops, local dress material sellers, sellers of trinkets and souvenirs, shops selling spices and local delicacies, juices, lassi all vie for your attention.

Heritage street at twilight

The Heritage street now has ample room for people to move around, benches to rest and most importantly numerous selfie points

You will notice that there are no overhead electric cables; They have all been channeled underground. All the shops sport uniform facades and the signboards too have been kept identical. The place looks sanitized and seems to have moved away significantly from its original self. However, given the considerable amount of footfalls in the area, this is a welcome change.

A large square or Piazza

Numerous places to rest and take selfies

The local body, during its revamp of this precinct has now brought out a streamlined package of art, culture, political homage, history and devotion. Maintenance via the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan (Clean India Movement) can bring in increased footfalls and the resulting opportunity.

Bhangra and Gidda performers

Bronze replicas of Bhagra and Gidda by women performers on Heritage street is a beautiful introduction to the Art and Culture of Punjab

Jallianwala bagh was cruelest of the many ghastly acts perpetrated during the British regime. Punjab was under extreme martial law during this period of 1919 led by the extremely oppressive and repressive Lt Gen Michael O’Dwyer. An estimated 6000 to 10,000 protestors were pummeled with over 1500 rounds of fire. Estimated that over 1000 died and many more grievously wounded. The inhuman nature of the regime was such that even the wounded were not tended to and were left to bleed and die. The monument is a painful reminder of sacrifices made by the thousands for the sake of the country.

Images from Jallianwala bagh of the eternal flame, memorial monument and a bullet ridden brick wall

The Jallianwala Bagh memorial. One reaches the garden after walking through the narrow lane which is the only access. The bullet ridden holes and the eternal flame

The Langar is a revolutionary concept and a long standing tradition in place since the time of Guru Nanak Ji since 1521. It was started as an effort to feed hungry travelers and bridge communities divided by caste by ensuring that everyone eats together in front of the almighty. Wholesome vegetarian food is served throughout the year 24 hours a day. Before the food is served, a prayer (Ardas) is recited over the completed preparations and it is blessed with the passing through of a sacred knife (Kirpan).

I had the opportunity to partake of two rotis, dhal, kheer and a cup of tea. Absolutely no dogma that one has to visit the Darbar sahib before visiting the langar. The mind does not rest till the stomach is taken care of.

Community dining hall, meal of roti, dhal and kheer followed by a glass of tea

The Guru Ka Langar Dining Hall. A modest meal of 2 rotis, Maa ki Dhal / lentils and delicious Kheer. A cup of tea

One activity that was hugely satisfying to take part in is the washing of the plates and cups used by fellow devotees and visitors. This is a voluntary activity that almost every visitor performs within the langar complex. They come in silently, pick up a scrub and go about the task of soaping the utensils. Once completed, other volunteers come to pick them up and carry them over for a wash in fresh water. Other volunteers are busy wiping the clean plates dry, women peeling garlic and many more rendering yeoman service within the kitchen and the dining hall.

Volunteers washing used plates, peeling garlic and cutting vegetables. Plates neatly stacked for distribution

Volunteers washing used plates, peeling garlic and cutting vegetables. Plates neatly stacked for distribution

A final walk around the Darbar Sahib complex presents you with various monuments and memorial slabs erected to remember difficult moments in Sikh History, Operation Blue Star being one which my generation has read about. The sentiments are there to read and silently absorb the enormity of the event and the impact that it has had on the history of this country. One thing i walk out with is that for the Sikh, country is the foremost and they rever deeply the land in which they live.

Coming up in part 4 a survey of the food scene in Amritsar and a visit to the Atari (Indian side) – Wagah (Pakistan side) border.

 

 

A Rejuvenated #Amritsar – Part 2 Darbar Sahib (The Golden Temple)

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View of The Golden Temple and the Amrit Sarovar

Part 1 of my blog on a rejuvenated Amritsar focused on the newest attraction in town, The Partition Museum, dedicated to the pain and suffering endured by millions during one of the largest and most brutal mass migration in history. The museum has since officially opened for viewing and more sections are being opened in a phased manner.

The Darbar Sahib well known as The Golden Temple is among the holiest of Sikh Gurudwaras (Gateway to the Guru). Moving beyond text books, calendar pages, i yearned for a visit. As a first timer visiting the Golden Temple, I felt a child like enthusiasm. The Gurudwara complex welcomes you from all four cardinal directions indicating acceptability of one and all. My driver guide parked his vehicle at the parking lot just before the Heritage street. The grand statue of Maharaja Ranjit Singh ji is a prominent assembly and a selfie point. One walks from here, follows directions leading to the Darbar Sahib (Golden Temple).

Statue of Maharaja Ranjit Singh ji at the junction of Heritage street and Town Hall road

Maharajah Ranjit Singh Sandhawalia (November 13, 1780 – June 27, 1839), also known as “Sher-e-Punjab” (“The Lion of Punjab”), became the first Sikh Emperor after uniting the 11 Sikh Kingdoms of Punjab on the foundations of the Khalsa and under the banner of Sarkar-i-Khalsa, from 1799-1839.

There is a free Footwear safekeeping area. The volunteers hand over a numbered token to help you retrieve the footwear after your visit. There is a steady flow of water near the entrance footsteps. Visitors must compulsorily cleanse their feet before entering the Gurudwara complex. You are watched by the sentries at the gates to ensure that this mandatory act is completed.

Chowk Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) entrance to the Darbar Sahib / Golden Temple

The entrance from the eastern side is from Chowk Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower). To the left is the shoe safekeeping area followed by a feet wash before entry

The moment you enter the complex, the Darbar Sahib glows in the crystal clear waters of the Amrit sarovar. There is no specific direction in which one needs to move before walking to Darbar Sahib. I headed straight to Darshani Deorhi, the doors leading to the bridge connecting to the Darbar Sahib. The glittering entrance has intricately carved marble walls with semi precious stones, a chandelier and wooden doors which were presented to Maharaja Ranjit Singh way back in the year 1800.

Entrance to the Golden Temple Pathway

Darshni Deori, entrance to the bridge connecting to the Darbar Sahib

There is absolute orderliness and decorum amongst the devotees. On special occasions and holidays one can expect a wait of atleast an hour before reaching Har Ki Pauri (entrance to Darbar Sahib; steps of the almighty). Elders and children are willingly given the right of way. Gurbani (Hymns from the central texts of Sikhs – The Guru Granth Sahib) recitals are played on the speakers and engage the visitors and devotees. Tireless groups of volunteers keep the bridge and surroundings clean with water and a mop.

Bridge connecting to Har Ki Pauri

Har Ki Pauri or Footsteps of the almighty is just before one enters the Darbar Sahib or The Golden Temple

Once inside the Darbar Sahib, one can go up one level, listen to Gurbani hymns, pay respects to the eternal living Guru, The Guru Granth Sahib. There is no ushering but sentries to ensure orderliness with respect to entry and exit. Even with a huge stream of devotees and visitors, there is absolute calm within Darbar sahib.

A pious ceremony is conducted every morning and late evening. At the end of a day, the palanquin containing the Guru Granth Sahib (Palki Sahib) is carried to the Akal Takht and is got back to the Darbar sahib in the early hours. This procession is said to attract huge crowds not withstanding the early / late hours when it is conducted.

History – The excavation for the Amrit sarovar (Holy tank of Nectar) began in 1577 during the lifetime of the 4th Guru, Ram Das based on instructions of the 3rd Guru, Amar Das. The final excavation of the tank was completed in the year 1588 by the 5th Guru, Arjan ji.  The temple construction was completed in the year 1601. First edition of The Guru Granth Sahib was installed in 1604. The first caretaker or granthi was Baba Budha ji. One can visit the old tree where the Baba used to rest and supervise the construction of the temple. A lot of the walls, domes and doors were overlaid with gold during the reign of Maharaja Ranjit Singh ji.

The Darbar Sahib has been witness to conflicts throughout history and has stood as a rock and served as a rallying point for sikhs. Legendary sikhs have risen from time to time to restore the honor and dignity of the Darbar Sahib after every desecration.

Visitors then walk to the Karah Parshad distribution center (A sacred food) to partake of the offering distributed by the sevadars. I also watched devotees return their quota of parshad at another counter and partake of only what is handed back to them.

Water fountain/water distribution center quenches ones thirst on a hot summer day. Volunteers tirelessly hand out steel bowls full of water to refresh oneself. Pause to catch a glimpse of the Darbar Sahib amid a few sips of water.

The water distribution center at Darbar Sahib for Devotees and visitors

The water distribution center at Darbar Sahib for Devotees and visitors

Devotees perform sevas as a thanksgiving in various forms one of them being the cleaning of the complex as a family

The Akhal Takht is the highest temporal seat of Sikhism founded in 1606 by the sixth Guru Hargobind Sahib. He wore two swords – Miri & Piri symbolizing Religion and Governance at this place. Two towers across the Akal Takht symbolize Miri & Piri. Historical weapons pertaining to Gurus and Sikh soldiers are displayed at the Akal Takht.

Akhal Takhat and Miri Piri

Akhal Takhat the temporal seat of Sikhism is a must visit. The significance of Miri and Piri in Sikhism should be read by all visitors

The political cum military power of the sikhs may be regarded as a reaction against the intolerance and bigotry of the muslim rulers leading to the oppression of the Hindus. Before founding of Sikhism, Punjab was trampled upon for over 500 years by invaders from central Asia. The people of punjab endured maximum suffering as hordes passed through it to the rich plains of the Ganga or to the south. Various army units that were raised have dedicated a slab of marble to commemorate their raising. These can be seen while heading towards the exit of the temple complex.

Dedication by the Armed Forces

A whole lot of marble slabs dedicated by various companies of Armed Forces praying for their safety and well being.

The Journey within the Golden Temple complex continues with a meal at the Guru Da Langar and a walk on the Heritage street.

Getting There : Amritsar is a 7 hour journey by road covering over 450 kms. It is well connected by direct flights between Mumbai and Delhi. Plenty of trains run between Amritsar and other important cities of India namely New Delhi, Kolkata, Ahmedabad and Mumbai

Text Sources:

  1. Sikhism by R.C Majumdar part of the series on The Mughals

 

 

 

 

 

Re-imagining our Museums

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Lobby of the Mumbai Museum

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”

To help us realize the above statement, we have two wonderful assets in the form of the National Museum in New Delhi and the Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (Formerly The Prince of Wales Museum) in Mumbai. It was heartening to visit the flagship museums of our country. Yes, things are getting better with plenty of opportunities for innovation.

Clockwise from top Foyer of Mumbai museum, walkway to the Mumbai Museum and the Delhi National Museum

Clockwise from top Foyer of Mumbai museum, walkway to the Mumbai Museum and the Delhi National Museum

The teams at both the museums have started engaging visitors by including audio guides, brochures, guide books, audio visual shows and other theme based events like the International day Yoga. The counter staff are knowledgable about the exhibit areas,  conduct themselves very professionally and regularly seek suggestions from the visitors.

  • Both the museums begin their tours with an introduction to civilizations of the world. Busy charts, maps and a few artifacts crowd out entire floors. How relevant is it to showcase a bathing area, ritual pots and pans without an accompanying audio visual show talking about how people lived in those days? Digital enhances the visitor experience. The same can be made available through a museum website for people outside of these cities to get a virtual walk through
  • Our governments still own our museums; This strength should be used to rope in more Thematic content like the one organized during International Yoga day for example. With India’s excellent diplomatic relations with UN Member countries, a bi monthly showcase with one such country can help our fellow country men know the country and its people a lot better. This can be a physical exhibition plus a digital feature as well. How about a Japan month to start with? The Museum of Tribal arts and artifacts in Bhubaneshwar, Orissa is a brilliant theme based exhibition of Orissa’s Tribal roots. The staff in the museum are extremely knowledgable about their own and explain their culture with a truck load of passion

 

The Bhubaneshwar, Orissa museum of Tribal Arts and Artifacts, A must visit!

The Bhubaneshwar, Orissa museum of Tribal Arts and Artifacts, A must visit!

  • There are sections within museums which deserve to be re-imagined. The coinage gallery in the National museum for example. Who in current times will get excited with a dour exhibit which does not have any interactivity. How about a small game helping visitors understand how coinage has evolved in India
The Coinage gallery which one just breezes past for lack of interactivity. Cluttered Museum floor impeding smooth movement of Visitors

The Coinage gallery which one just breezes past for lack of interactivity. Cluttered Museum floor impeding smooth movement of Visitors

  • The stone and Bronze sculpture galleries detail the art across various empires of India . It will be wonderful to see some of India’s stolen and recovered sculptures being showcased. An interactive digital gallery which explains making of sculptures and explaining the significance of symbols can excite the visitor to delve deeper in to our country’s rich past
The Stone and Bronze sculpture sections in both the Museums across various epochs. Vishnu, Ganesh, Kuber, Durga and Buddha are common themes

The Stone and Bronze sculpture sections in both the Museums across various epochs. Vishnu, Ganesh, Kuber, Durga and Buddha are common themes

  • Both the museums take pride in the collections of their paintings, especially the miniatures and European art collection in Mumbai. I don’t understand western art. How can we help the average visitor understand and appreciate art? Can the website or a Kiosk help enhance the experience and get the visitor to better appreciate art? We have numerous art schools and am sure many of them would love to hand a summer project to their students in this area
  • The Mumbai museum has a well curated Textile section which i think is a real crowd puller. Similarly there is a lot to be explored across
    • Agricultural history and evolution of Irrigation in India
    • Maritime Trade history of India
    • India’s forces and a light and sound show – Army, Navy and Air Force
    • India’s space history and accomplishments
    • Indian Railways – Engine of growth for the country
    • Wars fought by India and where we were involved like the II world war
    • Using global visual archives to help the visitor understand India’s contribution to peacekeeping efforts across the world
    • India’s victories to keep its borders secure
A textile map of India, Prints of various states of India, Child dresses, Parsee Saree

The Textile Heritage of India showcased within the precincts of the Mumbai Museum

  • The Mumbai Museum has actively engaged children and adults with small craft workshops, making ones own pre-historic tile and printing on paper and cloth. This is a good beginning
  • Both the Museums have in-museum stores and have stocked up on a good collection of take aways that are reasonably priced and of good quality. Key chains with miniatures, Coffee table books, pen holders, bags and other interesting gifting ideas

At the same time, important to be mindful of the facilities  like being disable friendly, providing ample sitting areas, restrooms at every level, water fountains and cafes. Without these it is a bit cruel to expect the Old, children and the infirm to visit our Museum.

Safety is another aspect of our Museums which have made news for all the wrong reasons. A fire or a deluge can wipe out decades of painstaking curation efforts. It can be heart wrenching to lose precious artifacts. Digitizing them offers an option apart from mandatory safety mechanisms.

Museums tell stories and we and our children have and will grow up with stories, isn’t it?

Hotels & Homestays of Rajasthan – Jaipur

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The Golden Camel

Rajasthan is a popular destination India that gets extensive coverage in foreign countries. Palaces, Desert Camping, Festive colors, Safaris, Fairs, Religious circuits; the state packages everything that ‘The Land’ has to offer. Rajasthan has one of the best road and air connectivity in the country and tempts many in to taking road trips across the state. The blog below, authored by my daughter Rashmi, seeks to capture the beauty of Rajasthan through her eyes and words. The trip was organized towards the closing stages of the tourist season in the month of March. The weather is warmer than usual during the day but the evenings are pleasant with the hangover of winter. This road trip across Rajasthan was done over a period of 7 Nights and 8 Days.

In Part 1 of the road trip, we covered Udaipur. In Part 2 of the road trip, we covered Jodhpur and Ranakpur. Part 3 of the road trip was the experience from Jodhpur to Jaisalmer. Part 4 of the road trip was our experience was a Haveli at Nagaur which is en route to Jaipur.

Day 7 – Jaipur

Good morning! An early start would always annoy me but at the end, I’ve got to accept it! We started off with freshening up, Packing up our bags and heading to the restaurant for breakfast. Our breakfast was pretty early as we thought that if we left early for our last destination, Jaipur, we would get to relax more in the hotel and roam around in the markets more peacefully and be more energetic. We just had a bowl of cornflakes and fruits for each of us. We thought that we could fill ourselves by having some paratha but unfortunately, it took a little longer than expected to serve it to us. We instead asked them to pack them in a small box and give it to us, so that we could eat it during our journey. We then left the resort after breakfast, by checking out and straightaway headed to our car, departing for Jaipur.

We didn’t really stop anywhere, but we saw Pushkar on the way. I did read and find out that Pushkar is a holy city and is famous for its Camel Fair held every November. Also, the city of Ajmer is located just about 14 kms (9 miles) from Pushkar. Ajmer town houses the Dargah (resting place) of Saint Khwaja Moin-ud-din Chisti. This Dargah is visited by people of all religions. We didn’t stop in Pushkar because the weather outside was burning hot and we did not want to get more tanned!

We then finally entered Jaipur, an extremely lively city with the metro and various famous monuments and buildings. Our hotel was ITC Rajputana, which is a 5 star luxury hotel.

ITC Rajputana building, Silver door, Reception area and Lobby

The ITC Rajputana, Jaipur

The Lobby, Chandeleirs and a Golden Camel

The Lobby and Lighting at ITC Rajputana

We checked into our hotel and surprisingly got an upgrade to a luxury category. We were escorted to our room which was extremely beautiful and elegant looking. It was almost afternoon by the time we settled down, we ordered some rice to our room because that is the only food that fills us! We also had the parathas(paneer and gobi), which were also delicious. We rested on the bed for a while..My mother wanted to visit the markets in the afternoon to buy some dress materials and gifts for relatives. I was really tired after all the journey and kindly refused to go with my mom, which she happily accepted. While my mom was between the clothes of the market, me and my grandfather had a tiny nap. By the time my mom returned, it was evening and we were scheduled to have dinner with one of my mom’s well known tour operator in Rajasthan. Unfortunately, he couldn’t turn up for some issue but his representative came to our hotel and gave us a bag of sweets and chocolates, on behalf of the head tour operator). That was nice… We roamed around the hotel for a while, saw the paintings put up as an art exhibition by someone on that day and spent some time in the lobby. We finally headed for dinner where we already had our buffet dinner package included. Dinner was super delicious and excellent. We had a slow an amazing dinner time at the restaurant, chit-chatting, listening to the music being played and seeing the people coming and going. Dinner filled us and we ended our long day, finally by getting into comfortable clothes and watching some T.V till late night…Hmm, That was indeed an awesome day!

Day 8 – Jaipur at leisure and Departure

This day was the last day of this beautiful work cum personal trip..The departure day! I was a little sad because I never wanted to leave any of the resorts and the trip was so enjoyable, meeting new people and visiting new places. We got ready and headed for breakfast..   The breakfast hall was full but we had been reserved a table which was very nice of the staff. Breakfast provided a wide variety of different cuisines and juices(including vegetable juices) which was very impressive. We had a filling breakfast and then left the hotel for some sightseeing. We just took a short ride in the city and we also saw the Hawa Mahal, Amer fort which is spectacular and visited the markets to buy some clothes for me with the typical jaipuri elephant print.

Amer Fort and Maota Lake

The Amer Fort, Jaipur

That was just a short ride and then we headed back to our hotel to pack our luggage and get ready to check out in a while. By the time we cam down to the reception with all our bags, it was nearly later than noon. Luckily, we got an extension for our checkout time as our flight was later in the afternoon and nearly evening. Till then, we did some time pass in the lobby and had some beverages in the restaurant. Time just flew and finally the moment came, when I had to finally say bye to the last and one of the favorite hotel of this trip. We left by saying goodbye to all the smiling faces and a goodbye to the city of Jaipur. The airport was about 15km from the city which was not much distance. We came to the airport perfectly on time and bid adieu to our driver, who was extremely good and warm, with a small gift. As usual, we completed all the airport procedures which I don’t think need to be explained! Rajasthan, a place nobody can forget was finally ready to welcome me next time…

Thank you so much to the Government of Rajasthan, which has made the state beautiful and the biggest amount of thanks to the people of rajasthan, who add the essence of love and warmth in the state..Good bye Rajsthan! Hope to see you soon !!

Getting there – Jaipur is well connected by air from all parts of the country. Jet AirwaysAir IndiaIndigo and Spicejet are airlines offering connectivity to Jaipur. Jaipur has excellent rail connectivity and  Indian Railways offers convenient trains from all major metros. Jaipur is just 5 hours driving distance from New Delhi.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hotels & Homestays of Rajasthan – Nagaur

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Map of Rajasthan

Rajasthan is a popular destination India that gets extensive coverage in foreign countries. Palaces, Desert Camping, Festive colors, Safaris, Fairs, Religious circuits; the state packages everything that ‘The Land’ has to offer. Rajasthan has one of the best road and air connectivity in the country and tempts many in to taking road trips across the state. The blog below, authored by my daughter Rashmi, seeks to capture the beauty of Rajasthan through her eyes and words. The trip was organized towards the closing stages of the tourist season in the month of March. The weather is warmer than usual during the day but the evenings are pleasant with the hangover of winter. This road trip across Rajasthan was done over a period of 7 Nights and 8 Days.

In Part 1 of the road trip, we covered Udaipur. In Part 2 of the road trip, we covered Jodhpur and Ranakpur. Part 3 of the road trip was the experience from Jodhpur to Jaisalmer. Our next destination was Nagaur en route to Jaipur. The distance between Jaisalmer and Nagaur is about 325 Kms to be covered in a duration of 5 hours. A Haveli homestay was our primary attraction and we made it a point to experience the stay.

Nagaur – A city that finds mentions in the Mahabharata

It was another day with the start of a drive from Jaisalmer to Nagaur, which is a stop between Jaisalmer and Jaipur. Since the drive from Jaisalmer to Jaipur is almost about 10 hours which is very long, we broke down the journey at Nagaur which is halfway between Jaisalmer and Jaipur.

We started off our day with a hearty breakfast at Suryagarh, in the restaurant, which serves authentic Rajasthani delicacies. There are a few items that are mostly present at every hotel for breakfast like eggs, paranthas and a lot more things…This place also had the traditional sweets of rajasthan and the authentic Dal Pakwaan which is is also known as lentil crackers..We had a yummy breakfast and headed to the reception to check-out.

Parathas, Dal pakwan, Sweets and a masala tea making session

The Well set buffet breakfast options

We had a last few glimpses of the spectacular resort and finally left the property with a vote of thanks to all the staff who work hard day and night to keep their guests happy.

Next, we had a drive from Jaisalmer to Nagaur which was about 5-5.5 hours. We didn’t have any stops in between our journey..We straight away went to our resort which is a part of a fort that has been restored into a resort. Our resort was Ranvas at nagaur, which is a decent 4 star property.

Ranvas Welcome card, Swimming pool, Courtyard and the reception area

The Haveli at Ranvas at Nagaur

The environment is filled with plants, bushes, birds and trees. During our stay, the resort seemed to be quite empty but it had a vip guest staying, Mr Amit Shah, The president of the nation’s ruling party BJP. He had come for some program to Rajasthan, hence, a few of his people were also staying at the resort. It was almost afternoon by the time we reached our resort. We rested in our room for the resort of our afternoon, which was large and very spacious. Our room was built in a typical earthern style with all modern amenities. The place is filled with a long history and rooms form havelli’s here. There were like 2 rooms sharing a common garden with a big swing , to form a haveli. Our haveli was known as “Shekhawat Ji ki Havelli”. The rest of the afternoon was spent in relaxation, surfing and freshen up services given by us to ourselves! We then went out and roamed around the resort, at aroun 6 pm and took some wonderful pics. Check them down below!

Entrance to the Haveli, Peacocks in the garden, Open courtyard

The Aesthetically marvelous Haveli

Living area, Bedroom and relaxing chairs

The luxurious interiors of the Haveli

We also got a chance to see some beautiful peacocks in the garden, with their royal colurs and sweet voice. It was also a coincidence to meet the manager of the resort who was on rounds. He was the one who told us about Mr. Amit Shah staying in their resort. We had a little talk with him and just saw the whole property which also included the fort, a part of which was under renovation, and also the resort store, which was unfortunately closed for the day.

Then, we just sat down around the restaurant and chit-chatted and did some surfing on the net and then had dinner in the restaurant, which was facing the front of the property. The restaurant was empty except for some people who came a little later, by the time we had finished(9pm). For dinner, we ordered some lime juice to drink, tandoori roti, ker sangria(desert beans), Peas pulao and some dal makhni. Our dinner was light and filling. It is always a habit to give a bowl with water and a slice of lemon in it at the end of every meal, at an indian restaurant. But in terms of this, the restaurant was pretty unique. They did not serve the above but got a bowl of water for each of us and added a capsule like thing into it in front of us, which immediately turned into a small sized towel that could be used to clean our hands. This really surprised us and we appreciated the hotel’s thinking for such a unique idea..

Structures within the Haveli area

Twilight at the Ranvas Haveli, Nagaur

Then, we headed back to our room and got lazy..Me and my grandfather watched our missed episodes of our favourite tv programs on the ipad, and then talked a litte & dozed off for the rest of the night! Gotta early start tomorrow!

Getting there – Nagpur can be accessed easily from Jaipur which has a well serviced airport.  Jet AirwaysAir India, Indigo and Spicejet are airlines offering connectivity to Jaipur.   Nagaur also has a railhead and Indian Railways offers convenient trains from Jaipur.