Journeysmatter

A blog on journeys, great destinations and fantastic travel experiences

Seeing Myanmar along the Ayeyarwady / Irrawady River – Innwa An Ancient capital

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A family out for their morning chores use traditional bullock carts for their travel. The graceful lady of the house presents a confident smile while cradling her little one; All this while the husband while watching the road is also keeping an eye on his family

The Irrawady river in Myanmar (formerly known as Burma) is the country’s largest river flowing from North to South and also a commercial waterway. Yes, the country flourishes along its banks. What better way to experience Myanmar. Towards the latter part of the Monsoon, we embarked on a 3 night cruise on the river on board The Strand.

The Strand Luxury Cruise boat on the Ayeyarwady complete with luxury cabins, great food, wines and the best of Asian hospitality
The Strand on the Ayeyarwady

In Part 1 of this blog series we explored the U-Bein bridge in Mandalay. In Part 2 of this blog series we explored the township of Mingun in the Mandalay region. We continue our exploration of Mandalay with a shore expedition to Innwa also called as Ava

Creating Travel Experiences in #Myanmar

As we wound up our excursion in Mingun, the Strand Cruise team helped us to our rooms, introduced us to the staff on board, amenities available and ensured that we got comfortable with the facilities. The ever smiling staff accompany you during excursions with a picnic basket containing refreshments, wet towels as it can get extremely sweaty after monsoons and during summers and upon return to the boat you just feel like gulping all the cold drinks on offer. The staff request you to place your sandals which are cleaned off the mud and delivered outside your room. Comfortable slippers are provided to walk around inside the cruise boat. 

After a long day in Mingun, we continued 35 kms along the Irrawady river and halt for the night on the banks of the Ancient Capital City of Innwa or Ava as it was called when it was the seat of the Burmese Empire. The empire lasted over 360 years between 1365 to 1842 on 5 separate occassions. 

Tourism has provided the residents of these towns a wonderful opportunity to talk about their country, listen and understand what Tourists expect and ensure they carry home wonderful stories. Out of the moored Cruise boat in the morning, we board Horse carts to take us through the narrow and rain washed streets of Innwa to various places of interest. While it may seem like a very uni-dimensional way to travel, Myanmar will slowly but surely bring in experiences even to the smallest of monuments / destinations. However this opportunity we got was to explore a raw country which had just opened up. No sanitised experiences as of now like in Singapore, Malaysia and other SE Asian counterparts.

Pagodas & Monasteries of Wingaba, Myint Mo Thaung and Lawka Dawtha Man Aung

Based on interactions with locals during his journeys in Burma, Robert Bruce Thurber in his book In the Land of the Pagodas (Paya as referred by the locals) gives the probable reason for many Pagodas lying in a state of repair. It is believed that no merit accrues to anyone who repairs a Pagoda, except those of great note, repair-merit going to the original build. We really dont know if this is now a business of the state or Myanmar has transcended these beliefs.  

Wingaba, a square shaped Monastery is a deviation from the standard spire shaped Pagodas one regularly finds. Looking in dire need of maintenance, the flat roof seems to have remnants of spires that have collapsed. Insides of the Monastery have stairs to provide access to the top
Wingaba, a square shaped Monastery is a deviation from the standard spire shaped Pagodas one regularly finds. Looking in dire need of maintenance, the flat roof seems to have remnants of spires that have collapsed. Insides of the Monastery have stairs to provide access to the top
The Myint Mo Thaung is a Circular shaped Pagoda or Paya as it is called locally, with a staircase on the outside leading to the top. Seems a simple climb from outside but tests your lungs first thing in the morning. Nevertheless, the views of the countryside from the top are stunning. The rains leave a marshy pathway to be negotiated carefully.
The Myint Mo Thaung is a Circular shaped Pagoda or Paya as it is called locally, with a staircase on the outside leading to the top. Seems a simple climb from outside but tests your lungs first thing in the morning. Nevertheless, the views of the countryside from the top are stunning. The rains leave a marshy pathway to be negotiated carefully.
The spired stupa is the Lawka Dawtha Man Aung Pagoda. The Pagoda encloses a small shrine with a statue of Buddha in a small building nearby. The Pagodas house relics but not always one is able to find original relics and house them. Many Pagodas have housed replica of the relics and have drawn the faithful.
The spired stupa is the Lawka Dawtha Man Aung Pagoda. The Pagoda encloses a small shrine with a statue of Buddha in a small building nearby. The Pagodas house relics but not always one is able to find original relics and house them. Many Pagodas have housed replica of the relics and have drawn the faithful.

The Yedanasini Temple

The temple in Innwa is in a state of ruin yet looks spectacular. The temple is said to have been build way back in the year 1820’s/1830’s. A major Earthquake in the year 1839 brought down the temple to its current state. 

The Yedanasini temple is probably among all the well photographed temples in Myanmar. Set amidst thick countryside vegetation, the brick monument stands out in contrast in terms of color values.
The Yedanasini temple is probably among all the well photographed temples in Myanmar. Set amidst thick countryside vegetation, the brick monument stands out in contrast in terms of color values.
The complex houses the remnants of a triad of Buddha statues in good condition. These images have graced the pages of many travel magazines.
The complex houses the remnants of a triad of Buddha statues in good condition. These images have graced the pages of many travel magazines.
Assembly halls with multiple bays, windows and columns are said to be thematically similar to Siamese assembly halls of Ayutthaya (Courtesy - www.orientalarchitecture.com)
Assembly halls with multiple bays, windows and columns are said to be thematically similar to Siamese assembly halls of Ayutthaya (Courtesy – http://www.orientalarchitecture.com)

The Leader

The people of Myanmar have shown tremendous grit and have survived numerous crises as they transitioned from Freedom – Military Rule – Democracy. Daw Aung Sang Suu Kyi has been at the forefront of this transition. Respect to her is played out at almost all the places that we travelled to.

Suu Kyi also referred to as Daw Aung San Suu Kyi apart from being a Pro-democracy leader who has led her country on the path of democracy is also a source of inspiration for her countrymen. Youngest daughter of Aung San who died aged 32, she has battled hard to ensure that her countrymen are able to savor the freedom that democracy offers. She currently holds the post of a State Councillor which is equivalent to the post of a Prime Minister.
Suu Kyi also referred to as Daw Aung San Suu Kyi apart from being a Pro-democracy leader who has led her country on the path of democracy is also a source of inspiration for her countrymen. Youngest daughter of Aung San who died aged 32, she has battled hard to ensure that her countrymen are able to savor the freedom that democracy offers. She currently holds the post of a State Councillor which is equivalent to the post of a Prime Minister.

Maha Aung Mye Bonzan Monastery

Probably the best preserved monastery, one that survived the great earthquake of 1839 and subsequently got the attention it deserved towards re-building. This monastery is said to have been constructed by a queen for the Royal Priest. 

The monastery is a brick replica of typical wooden monasteries of that period. Constructed on a large base course / foundation with Masonry stairs, there are a total of 8 stairs leading to the shrine which is recognized by the Pyathat - a multi staged roof with an odd number of tiers. Within the monastery, there are living quarters for Monks along with a classroom; On the same level are the Royal Priests’ residence and Buddha’s image chambers.
The monastery is a brick replica of typical wooden monasteries of that period. Constructed on a large base course / foundation with Masonry stairs, there are a total of 8 stairs leading to the shrine which is recognized by the Pyathat – a multi staged roof with an odd number of tiers. Within the monastery, there are living quarters for Monks along with a classroom; On the same level are the Royal Priests’ residence and Buddha’s image chambers.
There are two sets of Perimeter corridors within the main Monastery. While walking through the corridors, it provides perfectly habitable weather with no requirement for any artificial lighting and ventilation. Today the monastery is no longer inhabited but is maintained in good condition. (Courtesy - www.orientalarchitecture.com)
There are two sets of Perimeter corridors within the main Monastery. While walking through the corridors, it provides perfectly habitable weather with no requirement for any artificial lighting and ventilation. Today the monastery is no longer inhabited but is maintained in good condition. (Courtesy – http://www.orientalarchitecture.com)
Chinthes are Leogryphs or Lion like creatures seen at the entrances of Pagodas and temples in Buddhist countries in the region. The chinthe is revered and loved by the Burmese people and is used symbolically on the royal thrones of Burma. Predating the use of coins for money, brass weights cast in the shape of mythical beasts like the chinthe were commonly used to measure standard quantities of staple items.The Chinthes seen here are at the entrance to the Maha Aung Mye Bonzan Monastery.
Chinthes are Leogryphs or Lion like creatures seen at the entrances of Pagodas and temples in Buddhist countries in the region. The chinthe is revered and loved by the Burmese people and is used symbolically on the royal thrones of Burma. Predating the use of coins for money, brass weights cast in the shape of mythical beasts like the chinthe were commonly used to measure standard quantities of staple items.The Chinthes seen here are at the entrance to the Maha Aung Mye Bonzan Monastery.

Moving on from Mandalay, our cruise set sail towards another ancient capital city of Bagan.

Getting to Myanmar

Travelling to Myanmar is now a breeze. Number of airlines fly in to Yangon with a single stop at any popular hub. Mandalay and Bagan are well connected from Yangon.

  1. China SouthernAll NipponBangkok AirwaysCathay PacificSingapore AirlinesThai Airways among the carriers from the Asian and South east Asian region
  2. Qatar Airways and Emirates from the middle east
  3. Air India offers twice a week flight between Kolkata and Yangon on Saturdays and Mondays. Its a surprise that the two countries which share such a common heritage still dont have good direct connectivity.

Tourists can check visa requirements on The Myanmar eVisa website. This is a government website and one can apply online for an e-visa. Check out for countries for whom Visa is provided on arrival. Indians can now apply for visa upon arrival. A recent government order to this effect. However, as a travel best practice it is always wise to utilize the e-visa facility offered. One however has to be careful while entering the passport details in to the Visa application form. Mismatch very clearly results in deportation.

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4 thoughts on “Seeing Myanmar along the Ayeyarwady / Irrawady River – Innwa An Ancient capital

  1. Pingback: Seeing Myanmar along the Ayeyarwady / Irrawady River – Bagan, A Cultural Capital | Journeysmatter

  2. Pingback: Sights & Sounds of Yangon – 1 | Journeysmatter

  3. Pingback: Yangon – Sights & Sounds 2 | Journeysmatter

  4. Pingback: Sights and Sounds of Yangon – The Circular Railway | Journeysmatter

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